Posts Tagged ‘Proverbs about getting old’

To age well die young.

Age gracefully; stay home mostly.

Age publicly; ache silently.

Don’t get old; get venerable.

Aging is not for sissies; it’s for bellyachers, complainers, grumblers and moaners.

Aging compulsory; engaging elective.

Old isn’t cute; it can be a hoot.

A small village can raise a child, but it takes a major city to care for a senior.

Senility is the crisis, midlife just a virus.

Dare to rove, leave on the stove, they’ll lock you up as crazy old.

Old, we increase, then we shrink.

The old may wonder why they are still here; their grandchildren know.

We’ll end as we began, gathered up and carried to our beds, blinking and drooling, and there with tucks, and pats and hums we will be lulled to sleep in a cradled, rocking world that loves us.

To be old is to be rusted, pitted, painted steel.

Forgetfulness is the curse of old age; it’s also the blessing.

To forget a friend’s visit yesterday and to remember a slice of wedding cake eaten seventy years ago is the magic trick of aging memory.

Old is rest and jest and slow, sly wink at death.

When the old are moved to the place called a home —  it won’t be.

Age graciously not pugnaciously.

Long life gives the gift of frequency; old age comes bearing treasures of poignancy and intensity.

The old out remember the young, out dance the middle-aged and out live themselves.

None outlive love.